Life Catalyst Institute Masters program has been approved as equivalent to a masters in health care and meets the required masters degree for nursing.

The Following is an interesting testimonial:

Patricia Sigley, BSN, RN        

Clinical Nurse Specialist

Professional

Practice and Education.

My department touches many areas of the hospital,

focusing on education of employees.  We write policies, research, teach

mandatory classes along with individual remediation.

Our department job description states:

"FUNCTION: The Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) serves as an expert clinical nurse who utilizes specialized knowledge, skill, and competency for promoting optimum care of patients, families and/or significant others within his/her area of identified expertise. The CNS acts as a consultant to the patient, family and/or significant other, nurse, institution, and community in the area of his/her expertise to direct movement toward maximum levels of health.

QUALIFICATIONS:

1. Graduate of Nursing Program, BSN / BA required.

2. Position requires a Master's of Science in Nursing and/or related field or expected date for completion of program of study. Will be referred to as a Clinical Specialist until Master's degree completion.

3. Current West Virginia State license as a registered nurse required.

4. Progressive clinical and/or managerial experience in area of specialty hired.

5. Analytical skills necessary in order to develop and assist in implementation of standards of care and standards of practice and evaluation of nursing care delivered to area of specialty.

6. Ability to assume responsibility for the best use of time and personal

productivity in the interest of utilizing self as an important corporate resource.

7. Interpersonal skills necessary to communicate and coordinate programs with a variety of health care personnel, and outside individuals or organizations.

8. Ability to work based on the operational needs of the Hospital.

9. Possess the ability to deal tactfully and harmoniously with guests."

The Master's program offered through Life Catalyst Institute was approved for my position due to the emphasis on interpersonal skills and the development of analytical skills.

Communication is a vital part of my position, to groups as well as individuals.  Having the ability to apply the Life Catalyst training strengthens my skills and communication techniques at various levels.  With this observation, my director accepted this program as a Master's in a "related field."

Life Catalyst Institute Masters Program meets the requirements for student success coaches employed by many colleges and universities.

There are other employment opportunities in the what we offer section.

 

All streaming information is found at the bottom of the home page in the 'Coming Events" Section. It also contains YouTube information.

  

A testimony that has just come to my attention and is therefore a part of current events is included here. I think that you will find it inspirational and very much on the nose in accord with what we are trying to accomplish with this model of life coaching.

 

Neil B. Lewis II Testimonial

Life Catalyst – Cornerstone

November 8, 2014

Thanks guys, first thing I would like to say is that some of you all might be able to relate to my story and others might hear it and think that’s not me I smoke weed or I just drink, but you’re all sitting in here with me, so you’re all here for a reason. There something in your life that you want to change to make better and I’m going to share how I got into this class, what I did to earn my spot here and how my life has changed and how I hopes it’s going to change more.

April 22nd, the night of April 22nd, I was on probation and was on probation for a couple of years and was getting high and that next morning I went out to get more drugs and I got more drugs and got high and laid down and when I woke up I was sitting in Winchester medical center.  Brad Triplett’s right there and five sheriff department cops in the hallway and a family member had found me and I was dead they took me to the hospital and gave me Narcan to bring me out and yeah Brad Triplett from the probation office is right in my face, “What’d you do, where did you get it from” and of course my minds all over the place, but of course I’m telling them anything but the truth “I didn’t do anything, I don’t know what happened, I fell asleep.”  “All right, here’s a cup, fill it up”.  So I took the urine test and I know I’m dirty and he said, “I’m violating your probation.  The hospital wanted to keep me in there to make sure I was ok, they keep me in there for four days in intensive care, hum, the last day I was in there they had changed my release date, it was suppose to be that day and they changed it to TBD, to be determined and in my head I’m thinking I know I’m violated and they’re trying to keep me in here a little bit longer so the cops can be there at the door to escort me out.  So I took the IV out, I push the nurse call button and told her I’m ready to leave right now and I’m leaving.  I put on my clothes and went home and I was there for about an hour before the cops picked me up and took me to jail.  I spent 90 days in jail and while I was there, I had a few people write to me and stuff.  You really find out who your friends are quick when you are sitting in jail or when you need a ride somewhere other than to get drugs.  You ask someone to give you a ride to fill out a job application, you’ll find out who your friends are real quick.

But, I had someone write to me in jail and you know just making small talk and I wrote back and I was like “a lot of our friends are in here, so and so is here, so and so is here.”  When she wrote back I was kind of surprised at what she said, “Those people aren’t your friends they are wolves.” And I understood what she meant.  Those people cared about what I could do for them and that was pretty much the only time they really wanted to hang out.  If I told someone I had a $100 bucks, do you know someone with a car so we can go get some drugs.  Oh yeah!  It’s two hours away, let’s go buddy, but, like I said if you asked those same people to take you to fill out a job application it’s like trying to find Waldo…they are gone.

I forgot to mention when I was in the hospital the police said we are seizing your phone.  From what I recall nothing was really on there, maybe some dirty pictures or something.  There was nothing that I could really get in trouble for.

Four days after my release I called the police department about getting my phone back and they said we are not giving it back, we are keeping it as evidence.  I said evidence of what you didn’t find any drugs in my house.  We are going to charge you with possession with the drugs we found in your system.  So, 4 days out of jail I’m looking at new charges for possession of a controlled substance and possession of marijuana for the drugs in my blood and at that moment if I had a gun I probably would have killed myself.  That’s how down I felt about my life.   I just got out of jail and I haven’t even had a week and they are telling me we are sending you back.  I called the probation officer and talked to her and told her what was going on.  I said please don’t violate me and give me a chance to get this case out of the way and try to get my life together.  She said, “well I’m not going to violate you right now, we are going to wait and see what the results of your case” And to me at that moment it would have been a perfect excuse to get high and I don’t know what made me say something different that time.  But instead of getting off the phone with the probation office, I said, what can I do to make my life better?  And she said, well, we have these meetings at the probation office.   I said, well I don’t have a car; I live out in the county.  What else is there?  Well, there’s Cornerstone Church.  I said, well, that’s were my grandma goes to church.  I’ll check it out.  She gave me the number to Dave Sandy and I went to church with my grandmother that Sunday and that afternoon I met with Dave.  Dave sat me down and he’s trying to figure out where I am at with my life.  I kind of gave him the outline of what happened. And he was like, well, what makes you do drugs?  At this moment I’m thinking this guys chomping at the bit to get me to start crying and be like I wasn’t loved enough as a kid, or I was touched when I was little or something like that.  Honestly, there isn’t a reason, you know.  I know there are a lot of other people who have had it worse than me and they never used drugs. 

My life wasn’t that bad.  I grew up in a single parent home, but it wasn’t horrible.  There’s really no excuse for me using drugs other than I wanted to.  I wanted to try it.  My excuse I told Dave, the two biggest reasons I like to get high are because I am alone or I’m around people.  And it’s true.  If I was alone, it was the perfect time for me to get high because it meant more for me and I didn’t have to share with anybody.  And other people, heck yeah, if I was around the wrong friends, of course we are going to be doing something like that.

So, starting with that call with the probation officer and she got me connected with Dave, that was the beginning of getting out of that comfort zone.  I was always really comfortable with getting high and hanging out with people and partying and I had made the decision to do something that wasn’t so comfortable, to start talking to people about my problems, coming to church, and doing things that I knew were right, but it might not necessarily feel like something I was comfortable with.  But I knew it was the right thing and I knew the more uncomfortable I was the more I needed to be there, because it was going to make my life better.

Started talking with Dave, was coming to church every Sunday, I would come to life catalyst every time we had it and it wasn’t easy there was a lot of things I might hear and oh, I don’t agree with that, but the more I came to both church and life catalyst I started looking for the things that I could relate too.  Slowly, things started to change things have gotten better in my life.  It’s by no means perfect, not at all and that was the big disappointment to me.  Ok, I’m not doing drugs anymore, so wheres all this money I should be having because I’m not doing drugs.  I thought everything would be perfect.  But there’s still problems, but I know there are a lot of people out there that have it worse than me and they are happy. 

When I came here and I saw people in church, being into drugs and alcohol I’m a very selfish person, but when I came in here and seeing people happy and smiling, I want what they have so I start doing what they do and that hasn’t always been a comfortable thing.  You come into a place like this and you think these people are going to judge me.  Thank god they didn’t have the heat on when I came in here because I would have thought that I was bursting into flames, first time I walked through that door.

But, the more I’ve gotten to know the people in the church I have realized that they are humans too and some of them have come from a lot worse places than I have and some of them have come from a lot better places than I have, but they are happy and that’s kind of what I want.  Like I said, looking back at where my life was and where it is now, it’s not perfect right now but it’s gotten a lot better and there’s still a lot of hurdles I have to go through, with the courts, probation, and honestly, the way that I feel about that stuff, court and probation, they don’t want you to get better.  And the reason I say that is because you are job security to them.  You are a pay check to them and if you go out and die tomorrow, there not really going to care.  Someone else will take your place in their eyes.  But the people at this church, they have a genuine concern about you and I’ve heard them say come in and talk to us.  They just don’t talk to you, they listen to you and that’s helped me a lot, knowing there was someone I could talk too.  And they might not necessarily be able to relate, but they can offer a different opinion other than my own.  Just knowing that I have someone there that I can talk too other than family or friends has been benefiting me a lot. 

Like I said my life has changed a lot for the better and I think everybody can get something from coming here and continuing to come here.  Your not going to hear everything they say but if you pick up on something new, then that’s good and your changing your life and I just think everyone should give it a chance and come in with an open mind and see where it takes you.  I tried a lot with drugs and that didn’t pan out.  That’s why I tried something different. Life Catalyst has made me a better person. I am very grateful to have the chance to change my life. A lot of people didn’t get that chance. 30 people have died so far this year from heroin overdoses alone. Many people have been incarcerated this year because of drugs and alcohol. Anyways, Life Catalyst was the first step in making my life better. Id strongly suggest if you are struggling with addiction or just want to better your life that you check it out and take that first step!

 

Here is a great article about what is happening in the mentoring world!

Mentoring programs see girls, economically disadvantaged student get head start in STEM careers

Stuyvesant High School senior Wendy Chou is getting a head start on a career as a researcher thanks to a mentoring program at the American Museum of Natural History.

That’s where Wendy, who’s 18 and lives in Flushing, Queens, discovered a spider fossil in a 52 million-year-old amber sample on March 12.

“This is a really good experience because not many people my age are able to work with a museum scientist,” Wendy said of the program. “It’s much closer to what I’ll experience in college.”

Across the city, more girls like Wendy are getting a jump on careers in the white-hot fields of science, technology, engineering and math — better known as STEM.

Hands-on mentoring programs, such as the one at the Museum of Natural History, are being developed to encourage girls and economically disadvantaged kids to become deeply engaged in STEM before they graduate from high school.

And city schools are taking steps to get more of those kids involved in STEM as well.

Girls have been left out of the STEM revolution in city education for years, with female students accounting for only about a quarter of kids in the city schools’ top STEM programs in 2013.

But now, there are signs that city girls are making strides in STEM learning, said Devora Kaye, a spokeswoman for the city Department of Education.

 “Encouragingly, we have seen increased female participation in STEM opportunities, both in and out of the classroom,” said Kaye.

Female students took more than half of all STEM-advanced placement exams in the 2013-14 school year, Kaye said. Nearly two-thirds of the finalists in this year’s New York City Science and Engineering Fair are girls.

But still, there is plenty more work to do to erase the STEM gender gap.

A recent report by Change the Equation, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that promotes STEM education, identified a “diversity dilemma” in STEM professions.

Since 2001, the percentage of women working in STEM fields like computing and advanced manufacturing has been stagnant, while the percentage of African-Americans and Latinos has shrunk.

Leaders of STEM-oriented companies are worried about the diversity of their workforce, said Linda Rosen, Change the Equation’s chief executive officer.

“It’s very well-documented that the most successful workplaces involve a diversity of perspectives and talents,” she said.

For both employers and potential employees, future success hinges on education. When students have STEM literacy, Rosen said, “all doors are open.”

In response to such demographic trends in STEM fields, the Department of Education has developed programs to improve access to STEM education for girls and black and Latino students.

The Software Engineering Pilot gives access to hands-on computer science learning to more than 2,600 middle and high school students, many of them from underrepresented groups in STEM fields. Schools also host mentoring events with representatives from companies like Google, Facebook and Twitter and groups like Girls Who Code to introduce students to professionals in the field.

And starting this year, the city’s new Science Research Mentoring Consortium will provide STEM mentoring programs for 300 talented but economically disadvantaged students at 11 city learning institutions, including five City University of New York research programs.

Likewise, the Summer STEM Program at Cooper Union’s Albert Nerken School of Engineering will offer financially disadvantaged kids, girls and kids of color a shot at STEM.

City students who are underrepresented in STEM fields can apply for financial aid to cover the full cost of the six-week program.

By inspiring diverse students to study STEM fields in college, programs like these help address growing workforce needs at the professional level, said Teresa Dahlberg, dean of the Albert Nerken School of Engineering.

“What’s good for underrepresented groups is good for everybody,” Dahlberg said.

 

Dog